Celebrating Leadership: 2013 C40 & Siemens City Climate Leadership Award Winners

Next week, C40 and Siemens will announce the finalists for the second annual C40 & Siemens City Climate Leadership Awards. But before that happens, we wanted to take a moment to reflect on some of the projects that won last year for demonstrating climate leadership in areas as diverse as urban transportation and adaptation and resilience.

Last year’s City Climate Leadership Awards winners include: BogotaCopenhagenMelbourneMexico CityNew York CityRio de JaneiroSan FranciscoSingapore and Tokyo.

The projects that won in 2013 feature the cities’ ambitious plans to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tackle climate change impacts and demonstrate innovative ways to respond to domestic challenges like air quality, congestion and community revitalization.

URBAN TRANSPORTATION WINNER: BOGOTÁ’S TRANSMILENIO & E-TAXIS
The city won the Urban Transportation award for its Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system, TransMilenio, which includes an 87 km network and 2,000 of the city’s buses, reducing emissions by 350,000 tons of COper year. Bogotá aims to replace its entire fleet of diesel buses with hybrid and full electric buses by 2024.

CARBON MEASUREMENT & PLANNING WINNER: COPENHAGEN’S 2025 CLIMATE PLAN
Copenhagen is demonstrating that emissions can be decoupled from growth: from 1993 to 2010, the city cut per capita emissions while the economy grew nearly 25 percent. The city won the Carbon Measurement and Planning award for its 2025 Climate Plan to become the first carbon neutral capital city by 2025.

ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILT ENVIRONMENT WINNER: MELBOURNE’S SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS PROGRAM
Ranked as the world’s most livable city by the Economist Intelligence Unit from 2011-2013, Melbourne’s Sustainable Buildings Program won the award for the Energy Efficient Built Environment category. The central element is the 1200 Buildings Program, driving the retrofitting of 1200 commercial buildings (around 70% of the city’s commercial building stock), responsible for nearly 50% of Melbourne’s CO2 emissions.

AIR QUALITY WINNER: MEXICO CITY’S PROAIRE
Once ranked by the UN as the most polluted city on the planet, Mexico City has recorded impressive reductions in local air pollution and COemissions over the last two decades. The city won the Air Quality award for its ProAire program, which has included efforts from banning cars in the city’s metropolitan area one day per week to implementing the longest BRT network in Latin America.

ADAPTATION AND RESILIENCE WINNER: NEW YORK CITY’S A STRONGER, MORE RESILIENT NEW YORK
New York won the award for Adaptation and Resilience for its comprehensive plan “A Stronger, More Resilient York,” which focuses on rebuilding the communities impacted by Hurricane Sandy and increasing the resiliency of infrastructure and buildings citywide, while addressing climate change.

SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES WINNER: RIO DE JANEIRO’S MORAR CARIOCA PROGRAM
Rio won the Sustainable Communities award for its comprehensive urban revitalization strategy, Morar Carioca Program, which aims to formalize all the city’s favelas by 2020. So far, 68 favelas have been re-urbanized for a total investment of 2.1 billion real providing direct benefits to more than 65,000 households. The project is set to benefit up to 232,000 households by 2020.

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT WINNER: SAN FRANCISCO’S ZERO WASTE PROGRAM
San Francisco won the Solid Waste Management award for its Zero Waste Program and is on course to achieve zero waste by 2020. Through convenient programs, public education, incentives and other policies, diversion from landfill rose from 35 to 80 percent from 1990 to 2010, and 428,048 tons of material was disposed of in 2012 – the lowest level on record.

INTELLIGENT CITY INFRASTRUCTURE WINNER: SINGAPORE’S INTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEM
Singapore’s Intelligent Transport System incorporates a range of smart transportation technologies, including one of the world’s first Electronic Road Pricing Systems: real-time traffic information delivered through GPS-enabled taxis and a highly integrated public transportation system. These solutions allow Singapore to enjoy one of the lowest congestion rates anywhere in the world for a city of its size.

FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT WINNER: TOKYO’S CAP-AND-TRADE PROGRAM
The city launched the world’s first urban emissions trading scheme in 2011. Under the cap-and-trade system, buildings over a certain size are required to take action to reduce emissions. Reports find that the 1,159 facilities participating in the program have reduced emissions by 23% below the base-year.

These reports will be distributed to officials in the respective cities to demonstrate the success of their projects, and are also available online.