• Case study

  • Case study

    In the early 1990s the City embarked on an aggressive program to protect and enhance the quality of New York City’s drinking water. Based on an extensive water quality monitoring and research program, the City determined the key sources of pollutants were inadequately treated wastewater; wildlife, especially waterfowl; agriculture; and stormwater runoff from development. The City designed a comprehensive watershed protection strategy to target these primary sources of pollution, incorporating both protective and remedial initiatives. The watershed program provides an alternative to expensive end-of-pipe filtration treatment.

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  • Case study

    The NYC Green Infrastructure Plan

    April 27, 2012 New York

    In September 2010, New York City released the NYC Green Infrastructure Plan, which presents an alternative approach to improving water quality by integrating green infrastructure, such as bioswales and green roofs, with investments to optimize the existing system and build targeted, cost-effective “grey” or traditional infrastructure. The full implementation of this plan will save the City approximately $1.4 billion and reduce combined sewer overflows by 12.1 billion gallons per year.

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  • Case study

    Tokyo has one of the most efficient water systems in the world. Its method of detecting and repairing leaks has halved the amount of water wasted by the City in the past ten years from 150 million m3 water to 68 million m3 water. Its' focus on same-day-repair work - has helped to drastically reduce the leakage rate - from 20% in 1956 to 3.6% in 2006, as well as reduce carbon dioxide emissions by about 73,000 t CO2 annually.

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