• Case study

    Växjö (Veck-quwere) is half way to becoming a city free from the use of fossil fuels. An incredible 51% of its energy comes from sources such as biomass, renewable electricity, and solar. In little over a decade emissions have been reduced by 30% per person to 3. 232 tons of CO2 annually - well below the European (8 CO2t/a) and world (4 CO2t/a) averages. The city has made this happen through rigorous planning and by closely measuring all CO2 emissions. With this track record the City may well be the world's first fossil free city.

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  • Case study

    Reykjavik has the world's largest and most sophisticated geothermal district heating system, which has used natural hot water to heat its buildings and homes since 1930. Today, geothermal powers the entire city - with an electricity distribution network harnessing 750 MW thermal power from steam, and a water distribution system generating 60 million cubic meters of hot water. The use of this natural resource has massively reduced the City's dependence on fossil fuels – making it one of the cleanest cities in the world. CO2 emissions have been reduced from 1944 to 2006 by up to 110,000,000 tons, delivering savings of up to 4 million tons CO2 every year. Geothermal has also contributed to Iceland's transformation from one of the poorest nations to one that enjoys a very high standard of living.

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  • Case study

    Kotka, Finland, is saving 390,000 tons of CO2 emissions each year through district heating and combined heat and power production (CHP) using renewable and recycled sources, as well as natural gas. By implementing a package of measures and avoiding outdated forms of power generation, Kotka has demonstrated the dramatic positive impact a local energy company can make to reduce CO2 emissions.

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  • Case study

    Helsinki has an environmentally and economically viable system of district heating and cooling that reduces emissions in the city by 40% a year - an average 2.7 Mt CO2 annually. Primary energy saved amounts to 9700 GWh in the Helsinki Energy system. A world-leading heat pump plant is playing an important role by recycling sewage to generate heating for the city - its one of a number of innovative strategies that are cutting fossil fuel use in Helsinki and helping to meet the City’s targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than a third of the current levels by 2030.

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