• Case study

    Växjö (Veck-quwere) is half way to becoming a city free from the use of fossil fuels. An incredible 51% of its energy comes from sources such as biomass, renewable electricity, and solar. In little over a decade emissions have been reduced by 30% per person to 3. 232 tons of CO2 annually - well below the European (8 CO2t/a) and world (4 CO2t/a) averages. The city has made this happen through rigorous planning and by closely measuring all CO2 emissions. With this track record the City may well be the world's first fossil free city.

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  • Case study

  • Case study

    The City of The Hague has developed an innovative energy concept that consists of a seawater central supply unit with a heat exchanger and heat pump unit that uses the nearby sea as a temperature source. The Hague and Vestia Housing Corporation have partnered with Deerns to implement this energy source in the reconstruction of 750 of the 3,000 dwellings located within Duindorp. Duindorp lies along the North Sea Coast and consists mainly of small family houses built between 1915 and 1931, formerly occupied by fishermen. The seawater central supply unit is connected via a distribution grid to the individual houses. Each housing unit will have an individual heat pump for further heating.

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  • Case study

    Reykjavik has the world's largest and most sophisticated geothermal district heating system, which has used natural hot water to heat its buildings and homes since 1930. Today, geothermal powers the entire city - with an electricity distribution network harnessing 750 MW thermal power from steam, and a water distribution system generating 60 million cubic meters of hot water. The use of this natural resource has massively reduced the City's dependence on fossil fuels – making it one of the cleanest cities in the world. CO2 emissions have been reduced from 1944 to 2006 by up to 110,000,000 tons, delivering savings of up to 4 million tons CO2 every year. Geothermal has also contributed to Iceland's transformation from one of the poorest nations to one that enjoys a very high standard of living.

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  • Case study