• Case study

    Nevada Solar One is the world's third largest solar thermal power plant, generating 130 million kilowatt hours of clean electricity to 14,000 homes per year and averting 100,000 tCO2e annually. The new plant showcases the latest in solar technology and confirms the potential of solar thermal as a reliable and affordable source of clean energy. State policies, support from the Governor, and advances in technology have been essential in making this source of ‘new power’ a reality.

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  • Case study

    Kotka, Finland, is saving 390,000 tons of CO2 emissions each year through district heating and combined heat and power production (CHP) using renewable and recycled sources, as well as natural gas. By implementing a package of measures and avoiding outdated forms of power generation, Kotka has demonstrated the dramatic positive impact a local energy company can make to reduce CO2 emissions.

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  • Case study

    Helsinki has an environmentally and economically viable system of district heating and cooling that reduces emissions in the city by 40% a year - an average 2.7 Mt CO2 annually. Primary energy saved amounts to 9700 GWh in the Helsinki Energy system. A world-leading heat pump plant is playing an important role by recycling sewage to generate heating for the city - its one of a number of innovative strategies that are cutting fossil fuel use in Helsinki and helping to meet the City’s targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than a third of the current levels by 2030.

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  • Case study

    Gothenburg’s system of incinerating waste to make electricity and heat is highly efficient. Benchmarked against other European countries, the system compares very favorably, generating 3.3 MWh per ton of waste for heating (27% of the city) and electricity, reducing landfill to a small fraction of the total waste collected, and cutting emissions by over 200,000 tCO2 annually. By generating energy from waste, 25% of the City’s CO2 emissions from energy consumption have been cut.

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  • Case study

    Göteborg, Sweden, adopted a system that cuts emissions by 94-97% for ships at berth. It has done this by using renewable energy from wind turbines to power ships at berth. Currently most ships get their electricity supply through onboard power generation by auxiliary diesel engines – a highly polluting and energy consuming method. In 2004, the scheme won the European Commission’s 'Clean Marine Award’ for outstanding environmental achievement. While Göteborg does this on a small scale it has great potential to be expanded.

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