• Case study

    Tokyo is helping energy companies to reduce CO2 emissions and shift to renewable energy by requiring them to regularly publish the amount of carbon dioxide they are emitting, and demonstrate their plans to shift to renewable supplies. In the first year of operation, six out of nine electricity companies had reduced their emissions by a total of 680,000 tons CO2. The strategy is simple - by requiring energy companies to show customers their green credentials, the City is driving greater competition for renewable-sourced energy. The City wants 20% of all energy to be renewable by 2020.

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  • Case study

    This is the largest city-owned solar power system in the United States located at San Francisco’s Convention center. Covering 60,000 square feet, equivalent to the size of a football field, it generates 826,000 kWh annually. This is equivalent to power 184 homes in San Francisco for an entire year, removing 7,000 cars from the road, or not driving 88 million miles. Over the lifetime of the project, it will reduce 35,000 tons of CO2.

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  • Case study

    Rome’s ‘Roma per Kyoto’ climate change strategy emphasizes the importance of working with large businesses in order to save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The partnership with the retailer IKEA is one example of this, demonstrating how a large company can reduce emissions and help other retailers in the community to improve their own practices.

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  • Case study

    The City of Portland has replaced all red and green traffic signal incandescent light bulbs with energy saving LED lights (Light Emitting Diode modules). 13,382 incandescent traffic light bulbs were replaced with LED modules, which save approximately 4.75 million kilowatt-hours per year. This is equivalent to enough energy savings to power over 350 Portland homes each year. The replacement to LED lights saves the city of Portland $335,000 annually in signal power costs.

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  • Case study

    In 2005, Ann Arbor established a moratorium on new street lighting aimed at helping keep costs under control. As part of this cost cutting initiative, the City began trialing LEDs for general lighting purposes. LEDs reduce lighting energy requirements by 50% or more, but their greatest benefit is that they last much longer than conventional bulbs, reducing labor and maintenance costs. In Ann Arbor, this will translate to annual CO2 reductions of 2,200 tonnes and annual savings of @$100 per fixture.

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