Boston

United States
Mayor Martin J. Walsh, Elected November 5, 2013

Boston in our Blog

Speaking at the C40 Mayors Summit in Mexico City, Mayors from cities across the United States have urged president-elect Donald Trump to recognize the real and urgent threat that climate change poses to the world’s cities, and to support them as they enact policies and programs to combat climate change

Read More

Nuestras ciudades están en el frente de la crisis del cambio climático. La subida del nivel del mar amenaza a millones de ciudadanos con inundaciones y, a su vez, los inviernos más fríos y los veranos más calurosos afectan especialmente a las zonas más vulnerables de nuestras ciudades. Las emisiones nocivas de los vehículos que circulan por el centro de nuestras ciudades contaminan el aire que respiran nuestros hijos. 

Read More

Nos villes sont en première ligne de la crise du changement climatique. L’élévation du niveau de la mer menace des millions de personnes avec des inondations, pendant que des hivers plus froids et des étés plus chauds accablent les plus vulnérables de nos villes. Les émissions nocives des véhicules qui roulent dans nos centres urbains polluent l’air que nos enfants respirent.

Read More

Our cities are on the frontline of the climate change crisis. Rising sea levels threaten millions of citizens with flooding, while colder winters and hotter summers take their toll on the most vulnerable in our cities. The noxious emissions from vehicles passing through our city centres pollute the air that our children breathe. 

Read More

According to a 2012 report by The Rockefeller Foundation and Deutsche Bank Climate Change Advisors, there is a $72 billion investment opportunity in commercial energy efficiency retrofits globally that could yield 848 trillion BTUs in energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 175 million metric tons per year, which is approximately equivalent to the annual GHG emissions from 46 coal-fired power plants. In cities like New York, energy and GHG savings lie in the multi-family housing segment, where 67 percent of the buildings required by law to measure and report their energy usage, are multi-family buildings. That is why C40’s Sustainable Infrastructure Finance Network, brought together policy and technical energy efficiency finance experts from New York City, Boston and Washington, D.C. to share best practices and lessons learned in financing multi-family retrofits. 

Read More

The potential threat which climate change presents to the economy, public health, and structural integrity of cities worldwide has recently become hard to ignore. Mitigating climate change requires a significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and adapting to its effects will require cities to prepare buildings and people for changes like sea-level rise and extreme weather events.

Read More

By Mark Watts, Executive Director, C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group

The United States of America and China are responsible for over one third of global greenhouse gas emissions. This month mayors and other urban leaders representing more than 60 Chinese and U.S. cities, gathered in Beijing at the second U.S.-China Climate-Smart Low-Carbon Cities Summit. These critical leaders in the fight against climate change came together to share strategies and lessons on how to get their cities, and therefore the world, onto a low carbon pathway.

Read More

Note: The following text has been adapted from Boston Mayor Marty Walsh's speech today at The Second China-U.S. Climate-Smart Low-Carbon Cities Summit in Beijing. 

Almost every country in the world is becoming more urban. We can say now, as much as ever, that cities are the future. 

This is a trend—one of many—that is bringing China and the United States closer together. As we become more urban, we become more connected: through technology, through economic relations, through cultural exchange. Therefore as cities, we take on greater ability—and greater responsibility—to collaborate, to innovate, and to lead together on the world’s hardest challenges.

Read More

At the start of December 2015, all eyes were on Paris for the COP21 climate negotiations, regarded by many as a pivotal moment in determining global climate action. C40 was fortunate to be there on the ground to help showcase innovative and effective climate actions taking place in the world’s cities. Through a series of fantastic events at Paris City Hall, Le Bourget and other iconic locations around the city, mayors from around the world gathered to celebrate successful projects and plans, share their stories and knowledge, voice their ideas, and establish opportunities for action over the next 5 years and beyond.

Read More

new report shows that city action is revving the engine of the early electric vehicle market. The report – born from a collaboration between C40, the International Council on Clean Transportation, the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, and the 11th Hour Project –catalogues actions cities, states and regions are taking to promote electric vehicle in an effort to better understand which practices are linked to electric vehicle sales.

Read More

The City of Boston has long been a leader on climate action. Since 2005, we’ve been tracking our greenhouse gas emissions, from both municipal operations and the entire city. And we’ve been making great progress. Citywide emissions are down 17 percent, while municipal emissions are down 27 percent since 2005. We are well on our way to achieving our goal of a 25 percent reduction in citywide emissions by 2020; and we’ve already surpassed this goal for municipal operations. However, we still have work to do. The Greenovate Boston 2014 Climate Action Plan, which I released on January 15th, not only provides a clear road map to achieve our 2020 goal, but it also takes a first look at how we reach Boston’s 2050 goal of an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.  

Read More

Boston has been a leader in climate action for a long time. In 2007 Boston became the first U.S. city to adopt green building zoning requirements. That same year, the City of Boston adopted aggressive greenhouse gas reduction goals—25% by 2005 and 80% by 2050—and launched its triennial climate action planning process to address both carbon reduction and climate preparedness.

Read More