• Blog post

    UN Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change Michael R. Bloomberg and C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group (C40) Chair and Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes today announced new research that shows that if all cities took on aggressive new efforts to reduce building, transportation and waste energy use, they could potentially reduce annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by an additional 3.7 Gigatons (Gt) CO2e by 2030 over what national policies and actions are currently on track to achieve. By 2050, cities could cut annual GHG emissions by 8.0 Gt CO2e over what national policies are currently on track to achieve, the equivalent of cutting annual global coal use by more than half. Cumulatively, cities have the potential to reduce emissions by more than 140 Gt CO2e by 2050. 

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    United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and UN Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change Michael R. Bloomberg today announced the launch of a global Compact of Mayors, the world’s largest effort for cities to fight climate change. The Compact will enable cities to publically commit to deep GHG emissions reductions, make existing targets and plans public, and report on their progress annually, using a newly-standardized measurement system that is compatible with international practices. Through this effort, cities will be choosing to meet the same requirements proposed for the international climate negotiations that will lead to a global climate treaty in 2015.

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    At the C40 Mayors Summit in February, C40 released the landmark research report Climate Action in Megacities 2.0 (CAM 2.0), which demonstrates a clear trend of megacities expanding and accelerating their climate actions. Climate actions – from implementing energy efficiency standards for buildings to adding bus rapid transit lanes – aim to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve urban resilience to climate change.

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    Humans solve problems by identifying the common patterns that can unlock similarities, explain differences, and relate diverse facts into a coherent whole. As the number of sources of information grows, systems become more complex, and social interactions take hold, decision making becomes hard; more an art than a science, prone to bias, and difficult for humans to ensure they are choosing an optimal path.

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